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Timeline of events in Texas school shooting

Timeline of events in Texas school shooting

People mourn in front of memorial crosses for the victims of the mass shooting that resulted in the death of 19 children, and two teachers in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 26, 2022. REUTERS/Veronica G. Cardenas

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May 26 (Reuters) – Following is the timeline of the shooting rampage on Tuesday at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Authorities said Salvador Ramos, 18, shot and killed 19 children plus two teachers after shooting his grandmother at the house they shared.

The information comes from statements by law enforcement and other public officials.

May 17 – Ramos legally buys a semiautomatic rifle on his 18th birthday at a sporting goods store in Uvalde.

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May 18 – Ramos buys 375 rounds of ammunition from an unknown vendor.

May 19 – Ramos buys a second rifle at the same sporting goods store.

May 24, some time between, 11 and 11:15 a.m. CDT – Ramos sends a series of three private social media messages.

— I’m going to shoot my grandmother.

— I shot my grandmother. (His grandmother survives the attack with a gunshot wound to the face.)

— I’m going to shoot an elementary school.

11:28 a.m. – Ramos wrecks his truck near the school after fleeing from the house where he shot his grandmother. He jumps out of the passenger side with a rifle and a bag. He sees two witnesses at a funeral home across the street and fires at them. He walks toward Robb Elementary School, climbs a fence into the parking lot and starts shooting at the school.

11:40 a.m. – The shooter walks into the west side of the school, apparently through an unlocked door, and fires multiple rounds.

11:44 a.m. – Officers from multiple law enforcement agencies begin to converge on the school. The gunman shoots at the first officers responding to the scene. The officers move back and take cover, then approach the suspect again.

Around this time, the shooter enters a classroom and massacres the students and teachers inside. Officers report hearing at least 25 gunshots from the classroom soon after arriving at the scene.

From 11:40 a.m. to about 12:40 p.m. – Officers on the scene call for more help, requesting tactical teams, specialty equipment, body armor, precision snipers and hostage negotiators.

About 12:40 p.m. – U.S. Border Patrol tactical teams arrive, enter the classroom, and kill the suspect.

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Reporting by Daniel Trotta; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Events leading up to ex-Goldman banker’s 1MDB graft trial

Events leading up to ex-Goldman banker's 1MDB graft trial

NEW YORK, Feb 14 – Former Goldman Sachs (GS.N) banker Roger Ng is accused of bribery and money laundering charges in connection with the multibillion-dollar looting of Malaysia’s 1MDB sovereign wealth fund.

Here is a timeline of key events leading up to the trial.

April 2014 – Ng, Goldman Sachs’ managing director and head of Southeast Asia sales for fixed income, currencies and commodities, leaves the bank for unspecified reasons. Ng had helped the company win business with Malaysian state fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB).

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July 2015 – The Wall Street Journal reports that Malaysian investigators have traced nearly $700 million from entities linked to 1MDB to bank accounts in the name of Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak. He denies the allegations, calling the reports “political sabotage.”

February 2016 – Tim Leissner, senior Goldman Sachs investment banker and chairman of its Southeast Asia business, leaves the bank. Leissner had helped arrange the sale of U.S. dollar bonds for 1MDB. The bank drew criticism from Malaysian politicians over the hefty amount it earned from these transactions.

July 2016 – The U.S. Department of Justice files lawsuits seeking to seize dozens of properties tied to 1MDB, saying that over $3.5 billion was misappropriated. The funds were used to purchase high-end real estate, jewelry and artwork, and finance the production of the Hollywood film “The Wolf of Wall Street,” the lawsuits allege.

July 2018 – Najib is arrested by Malaysian authorities on charges linked to the 1MDB scandal. He had led the country for nearly a decade and recently lost a bid for reelection.

November 2018 – U.S. prosecutors in Brooklyn unveil criminal charges against Leissner, Ng and Malaysian financier Low Taek Jho, alleging they conspired to launder money and bribe government officials in Malaysia and Abu Dhabi through the 1MDB bond offerings. Leissner pleads guilty to conspiracy charges and agrees to forfeit $43.7 million. Ng is detained in Malaysia.

December 2018 – Malaysia files criminal charges related to the scandal against Goldman Sachs, Leissner, Ng, Low and other individuals.Low has not been arrested by U.S. or Malaysian authorities.

May 2019 – Ng is extradited to the United States and pleads not guilty to criminal charges.

August 2019 – Malaysia files criminal charges against 17 current and former directors at subsidiaries of Goldman Sachs as a result of its 1MDB probe.

July 2020 – Najib is convicted of corruption and sentenced to 12 years in jail.

October 2020 – Goldman says it will claw back $174 million in executive compensation and pay $2.9 billion to settle with the U.S. Department of Justice and other U.S. and overseas regulators over its role in the scandal. The bank’s Malaysia subsidiary pleads guilty to conspiracy in a U.S. court.

December 2021 – A Malaysian court upholds Najib’s conviction on corruption charges over the 1MDB scandal. He says he will appeal the decision to Malaysia’s top tribunal.

Feb. 8, 2022 – Chief Judge Margo Brodie selects 12 jurors and six alternates to hear the case, which is estimated to last five to six weeks.

Feb. 14, 2022 – Opening arguments begin.

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Reporting by Jody Godoy in New York; Editing by Richard Chang

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.