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St. Mary’s to add Enhanced Security Measures for After School Events – The Southern Maryland Chronicle

St. Mary's to add Enhanced Security Measures for After School Events - The Southern Maryland Chronicle

LEONARDTOWN, MD – Superintendent of Schools, Dr. J. Scott Smith, announces enhanced security measures for after-school events. 

Beginning with fall sports for the 2022-2023 school year, St. Mary’s County Public Schools (SMCPS) is implementing procedures for school staff members and on-site law enforcement officers to identify prohibited items and reduce the likelihood of contraband being on a school campus.

Prohibited items include weapons, laser pointers, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and electronic cigarettes.  Outside food, drinks, and non-service animals are also prohibited.  During designated events, spectators should consider carrying a clear bag.  Spectators carrying items such as bookbags, totes, or carry-alls will be directed to an alternate line where staff will inspect the contents using a magnetometer.

Additional information on the new procedures and answers to frequently asked questions are available on the SMCPS webpage at https://www.smcps.org/safety-and-security/security-screenings


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School Events – Beaverton School District

Love The Bus Logo for American School Bus Council

Celebrate “We love the bus day” to encourage children to ride the bus! Create a one time event, or monthly encouragement to ride the bus to school!  Riding the bus decreases traffic congestion and emissions at the school, creating a safer environment. Bus stops let your children meet others in the neighborhood and builds community. Plan with your school to encourage students to ride the bus on the advertised day and give rewards as simple as a sticker or a high five!  

Steps to Organizing a Successful Bus Event

1.  Get Organized. Form a “We love the bus” School team that includes students, parents, teachers. Make sure the Principal is on board.

Start planning your event.  You can add many things to a bus event to increase children’s ability to participate!  

  • Will it be a one time event or a regular occurrence?

  • Decide rewards such as a sticker for riding the bus.

  • Set a goal and let the students in on it!  Create a poster or tracking sheet to publish results.  

  • Create a simple sign-in and draw for prizes.

  • Post dates in school newsletter and throughout school.

2.  Recruit Volunteers. Check with your PTO, Neighborhood Association and school staff to help with greeting students and the school’s celebration.

3.  Promote. Post in school’s newsletter and put posters up throughout school and neighborhood.

4.  Plan for Safety. Promote safe riding with this video! 

 

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Hattiesburg public schools implement clear-bag policy for athletic events

Hattiesburg public schools implement clear-bag policy for athletic events

HATTIESBURG, Miss. (WDAM) – High school football starts next week in the Hub City and Hattiesburg public schools are taking steps to make athletic events safer ahead of kickoff.

“It’s a policy that we’re implementing to further our means of safety for our fans,” said Greg Carter, Hattiesburg Public Schools athletic director. “You know, our ultimate goal is to keep our fans safe at all of our athletic events, and we feel like this clear-bag policy is a step in the right direction.”

The start of a new football season means new rules for Hattiesburg Public Schools.

The district is implementing a clear-bag policy at all athletic events.

“It’s the first year that we’ll be implementing it,” Carter said. “It’s been a policy for most colleges for a few years now. So, it’s starting to trickle down into high schools, and with the surge in violent crimes throughout the nation at large events, we feel like we need to do a little something further to keep our fans safe.”

The clear-bag policy goes into effect next Friday, Aug. 27, at Hattiesburg High’s first home varsity football game against Petal High School.

There are a few other different regulations fans need to keep in mind before getting to the stadium.

“It’s a clear-bag policy so the bag has to be clear but the dimensions of it is… the largest is 12 inches by 6 inches by 12 inches,” Carter said. “Now, you can also bring in a one-gallon size Ziploc-type bag.”

Small clutches also are allowed.

“The small clutch doesn’t have to be clear, but it has to fit the dimensions of 4 1/2 inches by 6 ½ inches,” Carter said.

While it may take a little getting used to, it all comes down to ensuring a safe environment while fans cheer on the tigers.

“We understand that this policy is going to inconvenience some, but we feel like that the safety aspect of it far outweighs the slight inconvenience that it may cause to some,” Carter said. “We do apologize in advance for any inconvenience that it might cause.

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Johnny Burt, a fixture at Utah high school sports events for decades, dies at 66

Johnny Burt, a fixture at Utah high school sports events for decades, dies at 66

If you attended a high school football or basketball tournament in the state of Utah anytime in the past three or four decades, chances are you ran across Johnny Burt.

The short, skinny, bald, bespectacled man with an irascible sense of humor and an infectious smile was a ubiquitous presence at Utah High School Activities Association events for more than 30 years, serving as a volunteer, doing everything from handing out stat sheets to sweeping floors postgame. Along the way, he endeared himself to athletes, coaches, referees, statisticians, parents, fans, and everyone in between.

Burt died Wednesday morning from liver failure at the age of 66.

He was born with phenylketonuria (PKU), the build-up of amino acid called phenylalanine in the body which can cause learning disabilities. The incurable disease is very rare, with fewer than 20,000 cases in the United States per year.

Burt grew up in South Salt Lake, but spent much of his life living in Sandy. While brother Doug and sister-in-law Peggy provided care for him, he was a longtime employee of the Murray Parks and Recreation Department, he lived on his own until the past couple years, and was a master at navigating public transit but also capable of driving himself around until about six years ago, according to Kevin Dustin, the athletic director at Salt Lake Community College, who has been Burt’s friend of 40-odd years.

“He was born with certain limitations, but he made it through life pretty well, and he did so in large part by being adopted by so many members of the community, especially in the sports world,” said Dustin. “He connected with people at sporting events. He just became a very endearing personality.”

Indeed, Burt loved the camaraderie of sports, and so became something of an addict for attending games.

More than once, Dustin remembered, he’d get multiple calls a day from Burt, letting him know that he was leaving a hockey game to attend an amateur softball game for 8-year-olds, following which he’d head off to some high school game or another.

And while Burt was also a fixture at Salt Lake Bees and Utah Grizzlies games, it was high school sporting events where he was known best.

“He was kind of a legend at state meets, particularly basketball and football — it seemed like he was always there,” said Tom Wharton, an ex-Salt Lake Tribune writer who has covered high school sports tournaments for more than half a century. “The [UHSAA] usually had him pass out stats to [writers], which was particularly a big job if we were at the Huntsman Center and working in the upper press box. He was kind of a tease — you’d want to get the stats, because you were on deadline, and he’d kind of hold ’em away from you, you’d try to grab [the stat sheet] and he’d pull it away. And then he’d just get this big, infectious smile like he was having a great time. You hardly ever saw him not smiling.”

Even though Burt was having a good time, he also took his volunteer responsibilities extremely seriously.

Dustin, who used to work for the UHSAA, recalled with a laugh the one time he unthinkingly went to pass out stat sheets to media members, only to have an irate Burt confront him and remind him that was his job.

In 2018, Burt was honored by the Activities Association upon his “retirement” from volunteering “after over 30 years of service to Utah students.”

“The passion around high school sports is what unites our communities, and Johnny certainly had that passion,” Rob Cuff, UHSAA’s Executive Director said Wednesday in a statement. “Johnny’s life was marked by an inordinate amount of hardship and struggle, but the same passion he displayed for high school activities allowed him to overcome the many adversities he faced during his life. Our thoughts and condolences are with all his family and friends during this difficult time.”

Dustin first met Burt in 1983 while working as an assistant basketball coach at Alta High, and Burt was the “team manager.” Because Dustin befriended him then, Burt remained a constant fixture in his life throughout the years, even as he moved to Cache Valley, then returned to the Salt Lake Valley to work for UHSAA and SLCC.

“Never a day went by [I didn’t hear from him]. In fact, if 5 o’clock came by and I hadn’t got a call from Johnny, then I’d start to worry,” Dustin said. “Usually he’d call me five, six, seven times a day.”

Despite his cognitive disability, Burt apparently had an innate knack for making lifelong friends. Dustin recalled heading to Burt’s 60th birthday party figuring there would be a few people there, only to discover a line of people waiting to greet him that took 30 minutes to navigate.

“What he really liked was the interaction with people. And when people recognized him, when they called him by name, he was instantly a friend of theirs,” said Dustin. “He was very loyal … once you helped him, once you recognized or acknowledged him in any way, you had a friend for life.

“… They broke the mold with him.”

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Flint school board candidate slate will host ‘Meet and Greet’ events throughout August

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FLINT, MI — Five Flint Community Schools Board of Education candidates are hosting nine “Meet and Greet” events throughout the month of August.

The slate of candidates — Dylan Luna, Emily Doerr, Melody Relerford, Terae King Jr. and Michael Clack — are five of 15 registered candidates that will be on the ballot for five open positions in the Nov. 2 election.

Events will take place in all nine Flint wards. A schedule is listed below. Each event goes from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. unless otherwise listed.

Monday, Aug. 8: Clara Hilborn Park in Ward 1

Tuesday, Aug. 9: Windiate Park in Ward 9

Wednesday, Aug. 10: Kearsley Park in Ward 3

Saturday, Aug. 13: Court Street Village Office in Ward 7 (4 p.m. to 6 p.m.)

Tuesday, Aug. 16: Longway Park in Ward 4

Monday, Aug 22: Sarvis Park in Ward 2

Tuesday, Aug. 23: Sarginson Park in Ward 8

Wednesday, Aug. 24: Ballenger Park in Ward 6

Monday, Aug. 29: Dort Park in Ward 5

In total, nine candidates are seeking three six-year term seats, two are seeking a four-year partial term and four are seeking a two-year partial term on the Flint Board of Education.

Only Joyce Ellis-McNeal and Laura McIntyre are not up for reelection.

Read more at The Flint Journal:

Flint’s superintendent wants to ask the Mott Foundation for help. Will the board let him?

Swartz Creek superintendent Ben Mainka leaves for Novi school district

Masks recommended, not required at Flint schools’ first day

Board member walks out as tempers flare at Flint schools meeting

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Canada Day event at Niagara-on-the-Lake vineyard encourages donations for residential school survivors

Canada Day event at Niagara-on-the-Lake vineyard encourages donations for residential school survivors
This year's Canada Day event at the Ravine Vineyard Estates Winery marks the return of the annual event since 2019.

With Canada Day just around the corner, the Ravine Vineyard Estates Winery in Niagara-on-the-Lake has announced the return of its annual celebration of the country’s confederation this Friday, July 1.

However, in a move that reflects the nation’s growing contention with the holiday as it unpacks troubling aspects of its past and present, the business is asking people to help a national organization aiding survivors of the residential school system.

The event will kick off at 5 p.m. at 1366 York Rd. in St. Davids, featuring an evening of drinks, barbecue-style food, live music, and a large fireworks show starting around 10:15 p.m.

This year, the winery is offering free attendance to the event for those who make a donation to the Indian Residential School Survivors Society (IRSSS), a British Columbia-based organization that provides services to the survivors of Canada’s residential schools and their families, helping them to heal from the trauma many former attendees of the schools experienced.

Tony Milana, general manager of the Ravine Vineyard winery, said the idea came from Paul Harber and the family that owns the winery.

“They’re very conscientious of these issues that have arisen,” Milana said.

Like others in Canada and around the world, they’ve been taking in news since last year’s of the discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves on the grounds of former residential schools across Canada, believed to contain the remains of previously unaccounted for children who attended the schools. 

This countrywide search began after the discovery of a suspected 215 unmarked graves in Kamloops, B.C. on May 27 last year. Last year, many called for the cancellation of Canada Day celebrations to honour those who lost their lives, and conversations around Canada’s legacy continue.

“As Canadians, it’s been a hard thing to swallow,” Milana said.

The winery has set up a GoFundMe page to collect donations (the page is set up to give donations directly to the IRSSS). Since setting up the page on June 24, it’s received nearly $3,000 in donations, out of its goal of $10,000.

“We just want to make sure we’re doing our part,” he said.

The event will also have QR codes on-site on July 1 to allow people to make a cashless donation before entering the vineyard. Those who donate online will be asked to provide proof of their donation when entering the event.

This is the first time Ravine Vineyard is hosting its annual Canada Day fireworks events since 2019, putting off the event for two years due to the pandemic.

Milana said the winery’s team is keeping an eye on the latest news around COVID-19, such as a potential new wave of cases this summer or the spread of the Omicron variant BA.5 in Ontario, and will be trying to host the event as safely as possible.

“We’re very excited about it,” Milana said. “It’s a lot of fun and it’s family fun.”

The winery notes this is a cashless event, and that parking on-site is limited. There will be spots available around the property for attendees to lay blankets or set up chairs.

For more information, including the food and drink menu, visit ravinevineyard.com/events/winery-events, and to donate to the IRSSS for this event, visit gofundme.com/f/indian-residential-school-survivors-society.

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School District 60 wraps up last month of school with several events – Energeticcity.ca

School District 60 wraps up last month of school with several events - Energeticcity.ca

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – School District 60 wrapped up the last month of the 2021-2022 school year with several events spanning many of the schools in the area.

According to superintendent Stephen Petrucci’s monthly report, Ms. Andrews’ class at North Peace Secondary School was working on creating models using 3D printing.

The model is printed in pieces, and the students were learning how to best organize the elements on the print bed, so fewer supports are required.

In-progress photo of a student (Angelica) working on a face mask. (Jen Andrews, NPSS)

Also from NPSS, two robotics teams qualified and competed in a national competition.

Lucas Gill and Mattew Esau placed first in the regional competition, and in second were Beneison Haw and Kordell Ollenberger.

The video from the competition can be viewed online, as it was held virtually.

Mr. Brandt, who also serves on the national committee, guided the teams.

(SD60)

The 2022 Elementary Public Speaking Contest was held at Anne Roberts Young Elementary School, organized by vice-principal Mellissa DeGroot.

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‘Miraculous event:’ Pope visiting former Alberta residential school site during visit – Cowichan Valley Citizen

‘Miraculous event:’ Pope visiting former Alberta residential school site during visit - Cowichan Valley Citizen

The program for Pope’s trip to Canada next month includes a visit to the site of a former Alberta residential school with survivors, the Vatican said Thursday.

The papal visit is set to start in Edmonton on July 24 and end in Iqaluit on July 29. It is to include public and private events with an emphasis on Indigenous participation.

“We pray this pilgrimage will serve as another meaningful step in the long journey of healing, reconciliation and hope,” said Archbishop Richard Smith of Edmonton, the general co-ordinator of the papal visit to Canada.

Pope Francis is expected to deliver an apology for the Roman Catholic Church’s role in residential schools during the trip, building on sentiments expressed earlier this year during an Indigenous delegation to the Vatican.

At that time, the Pope apologized for the deplorable conduct of church members involved in residential schools.

Pope Francis is scheduled to arrive in Edmonton on July 24 to a brief ceremony at the airport. The next day he is set to join survivors at the Ermineskin Indian Residential School in the community of Maskwacis south of the city.

Gilda Soosay, a member of Samson Cree Nation, said it is a “miraculous event” for her people.

“We have to look forward to what’s coming for our people, our grandchildren and the children coming after that,” said Soosay, who is part of the local committee preparing for the visit.

“We need to begin a healing process for our people here in Maskwacis.”

In a statement, the Maskwacis Tribal Council representing the four local First Nations emphasized the importance of the visit.

“This is a pivotal moment for the world to witness and understand the impacts of the intergenerational traumas suffered by Indigenous people in residential school systems in Canada and around the world,” they said. “This is an important step toward reconciliation for everyone to be a part of.”

Ermineskin was one of the largest institutions in Canada. Smith said it “will have a representative role for all residential schools.” He anticipates the apology will come in front of survivors at the school.

Francis is also scheduled to visit Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples, an Indigenous church in downtown Edmonton, on July 25.

Fernie Marty, an elder originally from Cold Lake, Alta., said he was excited and nervous about meeting Pope Francis.

“We have a unique history happening here. It’s important for my own personal healing to continue,” said Marty, who is a day school survivor and works at Sacred Heart Church.

The following day, Francis is scheduled to attend a large mass at Commonwealth Stadium, home of the Edmonton Elks CFL football team. The facility can hold about 65,000 people.

The pontiff is to go to Lac Ste. Anne that evening where a large pilgrimage takes place each year.

“People are looking forward to being with him. Praying with him at Lac Ste. Anne,” said Rev. Garry LaBoucane, a Métis priest and spiritual director of the pilgrimage.

Due to the 85-year-old Pope’s advanced age and limitations, Francis will take part in public events for about one hour, organizers said.

Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller said the federal government will be providing support to transport survivors, but he did not provide a cost. Planning is taking place to avoid a “logistical nightmare,” he said.

Miller added that he expects to attend events in Alberta.

The Pope is next scheduled to travel to Quebec City on July 27, where he is to meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Gov. Gen. Mary Simon, and later deliver a public address.

The pontiff is then scheduled to travel to Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré on July 28 for a mass. Between 10,000 and 15,000 guests are anticipated to attend.

“The Pope is very much looking forward to coming here,” Archbishop of Quebec Gérald Cyprien Lacroix said. “Despite his limited health, he will be fully present with us to live this next step in the process of reconciliation and healing with the Indigenous Peoples of our country.”

Pope Francis is scheduled to meet with Indigenous leaders from Eastern Canada on July 29 before flying to Iqaluit. There, Francis will have a private meeting with residential school survivors and attend a public community event.

The Pope’s priority during the visit is the relationship with Indigenous Peoples, Smith said, adding the pontiff has heard the cry for reconciliation and the longing for hope.

“This is one step in the journey,” Smith said. “But it’s a huge step.”

The program’s release comes as some worried the pontiff’s health may delay the journey to Canada. Earlier this month, a scheduled trip to Congo and South Sudan was cancelled “in order not to jeopardize the results of the therapy that he is undergoing for his knee,” the Vatican said.

Smith said the Vatican’s release of the program should provide an assurance that Pope Francis will come to Canada.

The Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program has a hotline to help residential school survivors and their relatives suffering trauma invoked by the recall of past abuse. The number is 1-866-925-4419.

—Kelly Geraldine Malone and Brittany Hobson, The Canadian Press

IndigenousPope Francisresidential schools

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‘Miraculous event:’ Pope visiting former Alberta residential school site during visit

'Miraculous event:' Pope visiting former Alberta residential school site during visit

The program for Pope Francis’ trip to Canada next month includes a visit to the site of a former Alberta residential school with survivors, the Vatican said Thursday.

The program for Pope Francis’ trip to Canada next month includes a visit to the site of a former Alberta residential school with survivors, the Vatican said Thursday. 

The papal visit is set to start in Edmonton on July 24 and end in Iqaluit on July 29. It is to include public and private events with an emphasis on Indigenous participation. 

“We pray this pilgrimage will serve as another meaningful step in the long journey of healing, reconciliation and hope,” said Archbishop Richard Smith of Edmonton, the general co-ordinator of the papal visit to Canada.

Pope Francis is expected to deliver an apology for the Roman Catholic Church’s role in residential schools during the journey to Canada.

On April 1, after meetings over several days with First Nations, Inuit and Métis groups at the Vatican, the Pope apologized for the deplorable conduct of church members involved in residential schools. 

Pope Francis is scheduled to arrive in Edmonton on July 24 to a brief ceremony at the airport. The next day he is set to join survivors at the Ermineskin Indian Residential School in the community of Maskwacis south of the city. 

Gilda Soosay, a member of Samson Cree Nation, is calling the Pope’s visit to Maskwacis a “miraculous event” for her people. 

“It’s a step forward to the path of healing for the Indigenous people. … We have to look forward to what’s coming for our people, our grandchildren and the children coming after that,” said Soosay, who is part of the church committee in Maskwacis preparing for the pope’s visit. 

“We need to begin a healing process for our people here in Maskwacis.”

Ermineskin was one of the largest institutions in Canada. Smith said it “will have a representative role for all residential schools.” He anticipates the apology will come in front of survivors at the school.

Francis is also scheduled to visit Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples, an Indigenous church in downtown Edmonton, on July 25. The church was recently restored after a significant fire in 2020.  

Fernie Marty, an elder originally from Cold Lake, Alta., said he is filled with excitement and nervousness at meeting Pope Francis. 

“We have a unique history happening here. It’s important for my own personal healing to continue,” said Marty, who is a day school survivor and works at Sacred Heart Church.

The following day, Francis is scheduled to attend a large mass at Commonwealth Stadium, home of the Edmonton Elks CFL football team. It is to be open to the public and the facility can hold about 65,000 people. 

The pontiff is to go to Lac Ste. Anne that evening where a large pilgrimage takes place each year. 

“People are looking forward to being with him. Praying with him at Lac Ste. Anne,” said Rev. Garry LaBoucane, a Métis priest and spiritual director of the pilgrimage. 

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops said that due to the 85-year-old Pope’s advanced age and limitations, Francis will take part in public events for about one hour. 

The Pope is next scheduled to travel to Quebec City on July 27, where he is to meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Gov. Gen. Mary Simon. He is to have private meetings at La Citadelle and later deliver a public address. 

The pontiff is then scheduled to travel to Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré on July 28 for a mass. Between 10,000 and 15,000 guests are anticipated to attend. 

The Canadian bishops said the public is also invited to a dedicated area during the Quebec City leg of the journey to watch the papal events on large screens and take part in Indigenous cultural events. 

Pope Francis is scheduled to meet with Indigenous leaders from Eastern Canada on July 29 before flying to Iqaluit. There, Francis will have a private meeting with residential school survivors before attending a public community event.

The Pope’s priority during the visit is the relationship with Indigenous Peoples, Smith said, adding the pontiff has heard the cry for reconciliation and the longing for hope.

“This is one step in the journey,” Smith said. “But it’s a huge step that has enormous positive possibilities associated with it in moving this relationship forward in a good way.”

The program’s release comes as some worried the pontiff’s health may delay the journey to Canada. Earlier this month, a scheduled trip to Congo and South Sudan was cancelled “in order not to jeopardize the results of the therapy that he is undergoing for his knee,” the Vatican said.

Francis has been using a wheelchair and has struggled to walk and stand.

Smith said the Vatican’s release of the program should provide an assurance that Pope Francis will come to Canada.

The Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program has a hotline to help residential school survivors and their relatives suffering trauma invoked by the recall of past abuse. The number is 1-866-925-4419.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on June 23, 2022. 

Kelly Geraldine Malone and Brittany Hobson, The Canadian Press